Removal of wisdom teeth


For some people, wisdom teeth may grow in smoothly - or not at all. For others, wisdom teeth can feel a little like party crashers, showing up late and causing problems.

Wisdom teeth tend to grow in much later than other permanent teeth, usually during late adolescence or early adulthood. If there isn't enough room in your mouth for these new teeth or they erupt in a problematic way, you may experience infection, discomfort or other issues. In that case, there's a good chance a dental professional will recommend removing some or all of your wisdom teeth.

While you usually have about 32 teeth in your mouth, sometimes your jaw can be too small to accommodate them all. If there’s not enough space for a wisdom tooth to come through properly, it may erupt at an angle. Before too long, it can start pushing against an adjacent tooth, causing pain and irritating the cheek and gums. The wisdom tooth will have become an impacted tooth.

Impacted teeth can lead to gum infection, tooth decay, damage to other teeth and even jaw cysts. Sometimes lymph glands under the jaw become swollen and sore as a result of recurring infections. Extraction of the wisdom tooth or teeth may be the best solution. Generally, upper wisdom teeth tend to be easier to remove than lower ones, and they are more likely to be impacted.




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